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Overall and Cancer-Related Mortality in the Sjögren’s International Collaborative Clinical Alliance (SICCA)

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Posterboard#: A0092

Abstract Number: 6506 - A0092

AuthorBlock: John Alexander Gonzales1,2, Jaskirat Takhar1, Vatinee Y. Bunya3, Jennifer Rose-Nussbaumer1,2, Annie Chou4, Lindsey Criswell5, Caroline Shiboski4, Tom Lietman1,2
1F.I. Proctor Foundation, San Francisco, California, United States; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States; 3Scheie Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, United States; 4Department of Orofacial Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States; 5Departments of Medicine and Orofacial Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States;

DisclosureBlock: John Alexander Gonzales, None; Jaskirat Takhar, None; Vatinee Y. Bunya, Bausch & Lomb/Immco Diagnostics Code F (Financial Support), Jennifer Rose-Nussbaumer, None; Annie Chou, None; Lindsey Criswell, None; Caroline Shiboski, None; Tom Lietman, None;

Purpose
While Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is known to be associated with an increased incidence of lymphoproliferative disorders, little is known about how SS adversely affects survival. Our objective was to describe all-cause and cancer-related mortality in participants enrolled into the UCSF cohort of the Sjögren’s International Collaborative Clinical Alliance (SICCA).

Methods
Retrospective review of the SICCA database registry. Patients were classified as SS or non-SS based on the recently updated American College of Rheumatology/EUropean Leaugue Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) criteria. Demographic information was obtained from the SICCA registry while mortality information was obtained from the United States National Death Index. Descriptive statistics were used to examine relationships between cancer-related death, female gender, and age. Logistic regression was performed to identify an association between SS cancer-related mortality.

Results
A total of 718 subjects were enrolled into the UCSF SICCA registry cohort. By December 31, 2017, 29 participants had died. There were 13 (53.9% female) participants who died classified as non-SS (mean age 70 years, range 54.6 to 87.8 years) and 12 participants (100% female) who died classified as SS (mean age 71.9 years, range 45.0 to 91.0 years). Four participants were unable to be classified according to ACR/EULAR criteria. In deceased participants classified as SS, cancer was the cause of death in 58.3% while in non-SS deceased participants, cancer was the cause of death in 44.4%. Four participants died to lymphoma-related cancer with 3 being classified as SS and one that was unable to be classified. There was no statistically significant association between being classified as SS and dying from cancer (p=0.22).

Conclusions
A higher proportion of women with SS died from cancer-related causes, though we did not find that being classified as SS conferred a higher odds of dying from cancer. Because SS predominantly affects women, it is important to be aware of its impact on women’s mortality.

Layman Abstract (optional): Provide a 50-200 word description of your work that non-scientists can understand. Describe the big picture and the implications of your findings, not the study itself and the associated details.
Sjögren’s syndrome is an autoimmune disease that causes dry eyes, dry mouth, and inflammation in the body. Sjögren’s syndrome has been associated with an increased risk of blood cancers known as lymphomas, but little is known about Sjögren’s syndrome’s impact on death in general or cancer-related death. We examined a database from the Sjögren’s International Collaborative Clinical Alliance and acquired death information from the United States National Death Index to investigate the cause of death in the participants from the UCSF subgroup.